Smoking Causes Cancer, Heart Disease, Emphysema

Smoking Causes Cancer, Heart Disease, Emphysema

Every time you smoke a cigarette, toxic gases pass into your lungs, then into your bloodstream, where they spread to every organ in your body. A cigarette is made using the tobacco leaf, which contains nicotine and a variety of other compounds. As the tobacco and compounds burn,

they release thousands of dangerous chemicals, including over forty known to cause cancer. Cigarette smoke contains poisonous gases carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide, as well as trace amounts of cancer-causing radioactive particles.

Smoking Causes Cancer, Heart Disease, Emphysema

All forms of tobacco are dangerous, including cigars, pipes, and smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco and snuff. Nicotine is an addictive chemical in tobacco. After you inhale tobacco smoke, nicotine flows through the bloodstream to your brain, where it induces a pleasurable feeling.

When you repeatedly expose your brain to nicotine, it becomes desensitized, making you crave more and more nicotine just to feel normal. Smoking causes death. People who smoke typically die at an earlier age than non-smokers. In fact, 1 of every 5 deaths in the United States is linked to cigarette smoking.

If you smoke, your risk for major health problems increases dramatically, including heart disease, heart attack, stroke, lung cancer, and death from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Smoking causes cardiovascular disease. When nicotine flows through your adrenal glands, it stimulates the release of epinephrine, a hormone that raises your blood pressure. In addition, nicotine and carbon monoxide damages the lining of the inner walls in your arteries.

Fatty deposits, called plaque, can build up at these injury sites and become large enough to narrow the arteries and severely reduce blood flow, resulting in a condition called atherosclerosis.

In coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis narrows the arteries that supply the heart, which reduces the supply of oxygen to your heart muscle, increasing your risk for a heart attack. Smoking also raises your risk for blood clots because it causes platelets in your blood clump together.

Smoking increases your risk for peripheral vascular disease, in which atherosclerotic plaques block the large arteries in your arms and legs. Smoking can also cause an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which is a swelling or weakening of your aorta where it runs through your abdomen.

Smoking damages two main parts of your lungs: your airways, also called bronchial tubes, and small air sacs called alveoli. With each breath, air travels down your windpipe, called the trachea, and enters your lungs through your bronchial tubes.

Air then moves into thousands of tiny alveoli, where oxygen from the air moves into your bloodstream and the waste product carbon dioxide moves out of your bloodstream. Tiny hair-like projections, called cilia, line your bronchial tubes and sweep harmful substances out of your lungs.

Cigarette smoke irritates the lining of your bronchial tubes, causing them to swell and make mucus. Cigarette smoke also slows the movement of your cilia, causing some of the smoke and mucus to stay in your lungs. While you are sleeping, some of the cilia recover and start pushing more pollutants and mucus out of your lungs.

When you wake up, your body attempts to expel this material by coughing repeatedly, a condition known as a smoker’s cough. Over time, chronic bronchitis develops as your cilia stop working, your airways become clogged with scars and mucus, and breathing becomes difficult. Your lungs are now more vulnerable to further disease.

Cigarette smoke also damages your alveoli, making it harder for oxygen and carbon dioxide to exchange with your blood. Over time, so little oxygen can reach your blood that you may develop emphysema, a condition in which you must gasp for every breath and wear an oxygen tube under your nose in order to breathe.

Chronic bronchitis and emphysema are collectively called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,or COPD. COPD is a gradual loss of the ability to breathe which there is no cure.

Cigarette smoke contains at least 40 cancer-causing substances, called carcinogens, including cyanide, formaldehyde, benzene, and ammonia. In your body, healthy cells grow, make new cells, then die. Genetic material inside each cell, called DNA, directs this process. If you smoke, toxic chemicals can damage the DNA in your healthy cells.

As a result, your damaged cells create new unhealthy cells, which grow out of control and may spread to other parts of your body. The most common cancer in the world is lung cancer, with over a million new cases diagnosed every year. Harmful chemicals in cigarettes can cause cancer in other parts of your body, such as: in the blood and bone marrow, mouth, larynx, throat, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, kidney, bladder, uterus, and cervix.

Smoking can cause infertility in both men and women. If a woman is pregnant and smokes during pregnancy, she exposes her baby to the cigarette’s poisonous chemicals, causing a greater risk of: low birth weight, miscarriage, preterm delivery, stillbirth, infant death, and sudden infant death syndrome. Smoking is also dangerous if a mother is breastfeeding. Nicotine passes to the baby through breast milk and can cause restlessness, rapid heartbeat, vomiting, interrupted sleep, or diarrhea.

Other health effects of smoking include low bone density and increased risk for hip fracture among women; gum disease, often leading to tooth loss and surgery; immune system dysfunction and delayed wound healing; and sexual impotence in men.

 

with over 7,000 chemicals released each time you light a cigarette, it’s no surprise that smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable deaths worldwide but with 1.3 billion people actively smoking what actually happens when you stop smoking within the first 20 minutes of quitting your,

blood pressure and heart rate return to normal this is because the nicotine in cigarettes released epinephrine and norepinephrine which increased your heart rate and narrowed blood vessels these effects also caused smokers extremities to feel colder but by now your hands and feet have returned to their normal temperature,

2 hours in and the nicotine cravings begin causing moodiness drowsiness tense feelings and even difficulty sleeping because nicotine also releases more dopamine than normal these are expected physiological responses to the decrease in its release eight hours,

after quitting and the inhaled carbon monoxide clears allowing oxygen levels in the bloodstream to return to normal carbon monoxide and oxygen compete to bind to hemoglobin in your blood which stretches the circulatory system so as it clears there’s more room for oxygen however for long-term smokers this carbon monoxide exposure causes red blood cells to increase in size making the,

blood thicker and causing higher blood pressure and increased chances of developing blood clot surprisingly 24 hours after quitting coughing will actually increase which is your body’s way of clearing out all the toxins from the lungs additionally at this point the risk of developing various coronary artery diseases decreases all within 24 hours,

after 48 hours when nicotine and its metabolites are completely eliminated from your body damaged nerve endings begin to regrow the tar and other chemicals and cigarettes leave fewer taste buds that are flatter with less blood vessels they now begin to regain their sensitivity making food tastes better although chronic smokers may often have irreversibly damaged taste blood at the 72-hour,

mark nicotine withdrawal peaks with headaches nausea and cramps as well as emotional symptoms like anxiety and depression these symptoms can be seen by most addictive substances including caffeine but after this period the worst is officially over after one month the risk of developing type 2 diabetes cancer and cardiovascular diseases has already decreased in three to nine months the damage Celia,

 The lungs are almost fully repaired which are hairlike structures that help sweep away dust and debris and as a result symptoms such as coughing and shortness of breath are almost completely eliminated and around one year the risk of developing heart disease as a direct result of at the Roma formation which is deposits of fatty material or scar tissue from deteriorating arterial walls decreases by almost one-half in 10 years,

the chance of developing lung cancer decreases to half of someone who did not quit smoking and in 15 years time the risk of heart attack decreases to the same as someone who has never smoked their entire life of course this guideline is not definitive and the average amount you smoke per day or year will play,

a role in how well your body recovers unfortunately there will always be some irreversible damage to the lungs and increased susceptibility to developing various lung diseases and while quitting may be difficult the benefits greatly outweigh the initial withdrawal ultimately.

 

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